The Delhi Rape as punishment of the uterus – a common theme in areas influenced by Jihad

Posted on December 31, 2012. Filed under: Bangladesh, Bengal, Chechnya, Delhi, India, Islam, Islamic propaganda, Jihad, Muslims, Pakistan, rape, Russia, terrorism |

The alleged gangrape and torture of a young woman in the Indian capital of New Delhi, which ultimately led to her death two weeks later has become partly an international, and definitely an Indian national issue. The youth of the capital took to the streets, and soon the government was seen to be on the backfoot. It had failed to gauge the game changing paradigm of electronic bypassing of older political mobilization forms. It unleashed its police on the youth while keeping up the appearance of listening to youth grievances by meeting student leaders from its own and other official political party student fronts.

The reaction to the protests and the nature of the protests – both represent a sign of things to come for the existing political parties of India, but more of that in a separate post. Today, I will only raise a disturbing angle of the alleged rape that haunts me through my comparison of notes of rape as a penal instrument, used all around the subcontinent. The issue is that, unconfirmed but semi-official media reports indicate the possibility of the woman having been subjected to sharp instrument insertion into the vagina, as well as the possibility of an attempt to tear out the uterus.

The use of metal/hard objects after or during the rape – is usually a feature of penal rapes, typically done in a gang/group, and is reported more from Islamist or Muslim contexts. The rape is not just about sex, but also about penalizing – for being a woman, for being a non-muslim, for being the “temptresses” and leaders of going astray – as portrayed repeatedly in various contexts in the core texts of the theology.

I would expect such penal rapes to be more frequent the closer we get to long-time centres of Islamic military power in the subcontinent, in a gradient of increasing intensity as we move from the east to the west of Gangetic Valley, increasing from India to the Middle East across Pakistan.

Although the Ayatollahate would deny this – the following has consistent commonality with what the Pakistani soldiers do wherever they go, with concrete evidence for 1971 in now Bangladesh :

http://www.americanthinker.com/2010/01/the_islamic_republic_of_tortur.html

“On August 9, in a letter published in the Etemad Melli paper, the reformist presidential candidate Mehdi Karroubi wrote that some detained individuals stated that some authorities have raped detained women with such force, they have sustained injuries and tears in to their reproductive system.”In another high-profile case, the very pretty 19-year old Taraneh was not shot with a single bullet to her chest, as was the case with Neda Agha Sultan There were no bystanders in the dungeon with a cell phone to capture the prolonged torture, rape, and sodomy of this teenager.According to reports, as well as testimony on the House floor from the honorable U.S. Congressman McCotter, on June 28, 2009, Taraneh Mousavi, a young Iranian woman, was literally scooped off the streets without any provocation on her part and with no arrest warrant. This young woman was taken to one of the regime’s torture chambers, where she was repeatedly brutalized, raped, and sodomized by Ahmadinejad’s agents, and with the consent of the “supreme leader,” Ali Khamenei.

Near death from repeated beating, raping and sodomizing, the fragile young woman, bleeding profusely from her rectum and womb, was transferred to a hospital in Karaj near Tehran. Eventually, an anonymous person notified Taraneh’s family that she had had an “accident” and had been to be taken to the hospital.

The devastated family rushed to the hospital only to find no trace of their beloved daughter. The foot-soldiers of Allah’s “divine representative” Ali Khamenei decided to eliminate all traces of their savagery. These vile people decided to remove the dying woman from the hospital before the family’s arrival, whereupon they burned her beyond recognition and dumped her charred remains on the side of the road.

Note that the intent is not to just to rape, but to kill. The target is the uterus. Here is the evidence from Beslan :
http://crombouke.blogspot.ie/2010/01/beslan-child-rape-torture-enforced.html

It was then that they began raping the girls. They wanted sex as they killed, and this is sexual homicide. A sex killer gets excited when he thinks about forcing himself inside an unwilling victim, but the rape itself does not produce the ultimate excitement. It is the rape followed by the killing that is arousing. This is what happened at Beslan.
One by one, females were targeted. The sex killers looked for the perfect victims, and after zeroing in, they grabbed and disrobed the little girls in the middle of the gym. There were muffled cries as the girls were humiliated in front of everyone. They were stripped, raped, and sodomized by several men. Not content to simply rape, the terrorists used their guns and other objects to penetrate the screaming victims while the other hostages were forced to watch. And the terrorists laughed. They laughed as they violated the children and made them bleed. What few people know is that some of the girls died as a result of being raped with objects. The internal damage was so severe that without immediate medical attention, the girls bled to death. Those who managed to survive required extensive reconstructive surgery and painful recoveries.But raping the girls was not enough for the deviants who had entered the school. The terrorists beat the other children. In fact, beatings took place regularly, and as they pummeled the little ones, the terrorists smiled and laughed. It was said that they would strike a child and then watch the child cringe. When the youngsters recoiled, their captors laughed. This says the offenders enjoyed inflicting the suffering. They wanted their victims to suffer.

Use of similar methods was peculiarly more intense in post-Islamic Spanish inquisition – compared to the rest of Europe. We know now, that opportunist Muslims switched sides during the final days and became devout Catholics. We see similar attitudes in Afghanistan, or Pakistan, or in the cancer that is now attempting to take over the frontier space across Russia in Daghestan or Chechnya.

Psychologically speaking, it could have connections to some hatred of the “mother”, the “uterus” being symbolic of that, a convoluted connection to self-hatred and hatred for imagined or real neglect/abandonment by the mother [and very peculiarly prominent in the founding stages of the leaders of the theology itself].

Whoever had primary role in that gang in doing this, is likely to have been exposed to the inner anecdotal/undercurrent of the meme of “penal rape” in the theology. By the way, with a lot of talk about Honey Singh, an Indian origin rapper apparently noted for raunchy lyrics and what has been described by womens’ rights groups as being misogynist and almost condoning rape – is claimed to be extremely popular or topping the chart in the Punjab and North India – and expectedly Bollywood. Now why exactly is he so popular exactly in that region, that saw the earliest and longest entrenchment of Islamic military power in the subcontinent – lies the answer.

Given the patterns, the psychological drive would be to dehumanize the woman – that is the reason even the penis is not used finally to commit the rape – it becomes a disembodied, dehumanized blunt or sharp tool. I would expect it to be accompanied by related dehumanizing actions – like urinating on the mouth/body etc. If they ever fully make the chargesheet public there is likely to be indications of this. But officially administrations typically drop the actual details of torture from public access. One cannot find the details in the judgment copies available for open access – on torture of women in police custody, for example. The now well-known case of Archana Guha’s is an example where public domain material, including the judgments, do not have the attached evidence – claims, and to know about what possibly this woman had to face, one has to look up a biography of her written by another woman.

My salute for the girl who fought to resist the six subhumans, as well as for Guha and her biographer.
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7 Responses to “The Delhi Rape as punishment of the uterus – a common theme in areas influenced by Jihad”

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One torture detail was reported by Fox News: “The men beat the couple and inserted an iron rod into the woman’s body, resulting in severe organ damage.”

Link:
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/12/29/indian-police-lay-murder-charges-in-indian-gang-rape-case-after-victim-dies-in/

Two terrible strains of thought clasped in one post… First, and it terrifies me, the prospect of some ill-defined theology that vilifies woman or the “uterus” – of course it’s not totally alien to us – both Hindu and Muslim texts denigrate women, particularly menstruation. It’s interesting that while semen is considered to be pure and potent, menstruation is considered as dirty in both schools of thought. The thing that terrifies me is the prospect that there are people who can carry out such violence on the basis of such ill-found and ill-defined premises.
The second strain of thought, is more disturbing though. You seem to suggest that due to some ingrained beliefs and pratices of Islam, regions dominated by that faith, or were erstwhile dominated by it seem to have higher rates of violence against women. You may be statistically right – I don’t know. However, I think it’s important to recognise that rape has been and continues to be used as a punishment meted out by conquering armies all over the world. Homer’s Illiad describes the orders given unto Greek soldiers – with a view to kill all of Troy’s citizens, born and unborn. White invaders from several countries have done it too – and most notably against the African people brought by force into America. Offsprings of rapes (and later mixed marriages) were initially denigrated as mulattos, although the politically incorrect connotation behind that term has been revamped since the 60’s. The Indian army’s record too, has not been without blemish in this regard.
I may be missing other, and more important examples. But what I’m trying to propose – without pretending to say that you’re wrong – is that violence against women is a world-wide phenomenon. It may be horribly obvious in Islamic states, but that may not be a solid premise to draw a conclusion as damning as that Islamic military rule perpetuates sex crimes. It’s like saying that other totalitarian regimes don’t commit sex crimes.

Sampurna ji,

“Two terrible strains of thought clasped in one post… First, and it terrifies me, the prospect of some ill-defined theology that vilifies woman or the “uterus” – of course it’s not totally alien to us – both Hindu and Muslim texts denigrate women, particularly menstruation. It’s interesting that while semen is considered to be pure and potent, menstruation is considered as dirty in both schools of thought.”

With all due respects, I disagree that Hindu “school of thought” considered menstruation and menstrual blood – dirty. The “dirt” bit appears in some of the later grihya-dharma sutras, like Vasishta and Gautama – but then again Apastambha is not so stringent. If we accept current official historian dating of these texts – they come long after Buddhist and other thought processes had appeared on the Indian scene with their obsessions about purity.

Rig Veda itself is much more ambivalent. In many passages, one can find problems with the blanket assumption of “anti-feminism” or anti-menstrual-blood theory. For example, some see in the story of Vritra slaying by Indra, the acknowledgment of an equal if not superior status to a possibly matriarchist society. If you have looked at the verses, you must have noted that Indra felt guilty about killing a “demon” who is also a “brahmin”, and to get free – he compromises with, among others, “women” in a “sin-eating” deal. Indra grants “women” the privilege of enjoying sex continuously, and replenishing their bodies and reproductive as well as sexual aspects through menstruation.

Many other passages, like the narrative of Sun’s daughter’s marriage to Soma (in RgVeda this is the only place Soma is equated to the Moon), literally celebrates the defloration blood of the virgin bride as a potent magical and supercharged entity.

Many scholars see the use of red ochre/vermillion or colour red in connection with Hindu marriage, as signifying blood, women’s capacity to shed blood regularly through menstruation and as connected to renewal of sexual and reproductive energies.

I don’t know why you think that “all” Hindus taboo’d menstrual blood, for I know that in many corners of India, including “caste” Hindu sections of Marathas, the first menstruation of a girl was literally celebrated as a joyous ceremony and occasion.

In many versions of Tantrik Hinduism, menstrual blood is a necessary and sacred offering.

” The thing that terrifies me is the prospect that there are people who can carry out such violence on the basis of such ill-found and ill-defined premises.”

Unfortunately, the rape with objects and twisting out of uterus, does have a long and traceable cult/theological thread of symbolism. But writing about them here will probably bring down all the blasphemy obsessed religions declaring jihad on wordpress. If its feasible, do search out the researches on religious icons and symbols used in the major religions to erupt out of the Middle East (as per their claims).

“The second strain of thought, is more disturbing though. You seem to suggest that due to some ingrained beliefs and pratices of Islam, regions dominated by that faith, or were erstwhile dominated by it seem to have higher rates of violence against women. You may be statistically right – I don’t know. However, I think it’s important to recognise that rape has been and continues to be used as a punishment meted out by conquering armies all over the world. Homer’s Illiad describes the orders given unto Greek soldiers – with a view to kill all of Troy’s citizens, born and unborn. White invaders from several countries have done it too – and most notably against the African people brought by force into America. Offsprings of rapes (and later mixed marriages) were initially denigrated as mulattos, although the politically incorrect connotation behind that term has been revamped since the 60’s. The Indian army’s record too, has not been without blemish in this regard.”

Agreed that totalitarian ideologies have been singularly associated with use of rape as a weapon of war. The question is not whether rape would have taken place whether religions or ideologies condoned or opposed rape. The question is whether a religion or ideology condones, promotes or gives divine sanction to rape as an instrument of war.

Interestingly, if you get through Mahabharata, all you can read about in the main narrative, is about abductions of women for “marriage” which we may argue as potentially a case of “marital rape”. But what is never discussed is that after the war is over, women flock at the battlefield to identify their dead loved ones and they are described as lamenting their losses while they organized the funeral rites on the banks of the river. We can see that they are allowed to move freely without the fear of being raped. There is no description or hint of organized, targeted, mass penal rapes on captive or enslaved women at the end of the war- as described by Homer, or on the women of scattered non-Muslim Arabian tribes and Jewish settlements like the Banu Quraizah, in the shahi(true) ahadith of Bukhari.

“I may be missing other, and more important examples. But what I’m trying to propose – without pretending to say that you’re wrong – is that violence against women is a world-wide phenomenon. It may be horribly obvious in Islamic states, but that may not be a solid premise to draw a conclusion as damning as that Islamic military rule perpetuates sex crimes. It’s like saying that other totalitarian regimes don’t commit sex crimes.”

I was tempted to hold my tongue here. But we should be able to cast our nets wider to look at patterns of similarity on multifactor levels. The modern totalitarian regimes we most talk about, the Nazis and Communist Russia and China, have uncanny parallels and links to memes of earlier totalitarian ideologies that rose out of the Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean.

Imperialist enslavement of “other” populations, for their resources and women can be easily exposed when they are not dressed in the garb of religious or supra-human sanction. The modern version of Christianity is the one shaped by the requirements of an imperialist militarist of the Roman world, who himself did not follow Christian virtues where women and slavery was concerned. In fact, there is a long running debate on the role and nature or acceptability of “slavery” and “rape”. Note that prohibition of rape does not figure anywhere in the ten commandments. Only “coveting” the “neighbour’s wife” is prohibited – for what some may interpret as obvious and practical military reasons – it breaks down cohesion and fighting unity of the group. Nothing is being told about the “non-neighbour’s” wife. One of the wisest kings of the monotheistic tradition did exactly that – coveted (and for all practical purpose raped) the wife of his devoted commander while she was bathing or otherwise on her rooftop within eyeshot of this sage king.

The Islamist texts are not shy at all about their claim of divine sanction to “use” captive women, and declare their marriage – if married – as automatically annulled. This type of annulment to facilitate rape – is unparalleled in all versions of Hinduism or Buddhism.

You must be able to see a common pattern between early communist literature that uses Christian phraseology of radical violence, or Nazi thousand year Reich which again draws on ME memes in a convoluted arc, Moses’s justification of slaughtering the women and the children of his host who had sheltered his people, and the Islamic textual pacification of husbands of a defeated tribe that the rape of their wives or daughters before their eyes were divinely preordained – or the WWII winners who slyly shift all blame on to Germans-Nazis while perpetuating the very same on Indian women during the Indian uprising of 1857 and Kenyans in the 20th century [in fact they were the first among Europeans who copied the idea of forcing Jews in England to publicly sport the star-of-David -a practice learned from the Islamic North African principalities].

There is a very fundamental and common thread between monotheistic concentration of divine power, imperial expansion under centralized authoritarian elite -reflecting the divine order on earth, subjugation of the woman’s body to the needs of the state [yes to reproduce for cannon fodder when needed, to distract and focus attention away from misgovernment as diversion for as many men as possible away from male frustration when needed, to be raped as a weapon of war on subject/inferior/infidel/pagan/ races], to justify collective “pain” as unavoidable price to be paid for “salvation” – whether that heaven is Christian, Nazi, Islamic, or Capitalist or socialist.

Problem with Islam is its methods of establishing unchallengeability of the authority of religious texts claiming to leash up in a tight noose every dirtiest detail of the human existence.

From your online-name I am assuming it is of non-Muslim Indian roots. If you are also a non-Muslim, see how you can easily bring yourself up to criticizing what you believe are the negative declarations in your birth-culture’s core-texts. Do you see the significance of the fact that no practising Islamic ever does a similar thing for his/her religion?

Hindus and Christians have been able to defang their textual-interpreters, because their own theology and culture retained a critical, questioning, analytical thread – often battered and bashed but always lying underneath as part and not outside of the system. Hence they are also subject to the fatal flaw of having to tolerate intolerance. Islamism constructed itself in a way that the clergy would never face that sort of a challenge from within their own following. This is what makes Islam’s misogyny so much more dangerous than other ideologies – once Islam can capture a society, it is one less society of the world that would ever protest its own misogyny.

“I don’t know why you think that “all” Hindus taboo’d menstrual blood, for I know that in many corners of India, including “caste” Hindu sections of Marathas, the first menstruation of a girl was literally celebrated as a joyous ceremony and occasion.”

A very good point. This practice is actually widespread in the South. In Andhra, it is very common. My own cousins went through that occasion. At the time I was too young to understand what it was about, but I later came to know the significance.

Recently, a famous Director in the Telugu movie industry had a similar celebration for his daughter. In English, it’s called a “half-saree” celebration, or something similar. A google search will tell you who I’m talking about, including pictures.

A girl’s first menstruation is celebrated as a sign of “richness” and prosperity. It is heralded as a sign of good things to come in the future, for the family. Having said that, there are other interpretations which say that women going through their periods shouldn’t enter a temple, in some places. I am not denying the existence of those rules. But, within the Hindu paradigm there are ample examples of treating the unique physiological processes of women as a “natural” process for their anatomy, and not something to be derided. And there are also ample examples of even glorifying the event, as the “half-saree” celebration shows.

Dear Dikgaj, please excuse me for the delayed response.

First, let me congratulate you on your command over logic and argument. Your step-by-step demolition of my more-well-meaning-than-factual comment is awesome. The structure of your reply starts by refuting each sentence/segment of my comment, with references to facts and texts, and then, tellingly, it ends with a question regarding my own identity and the culture-conditioning reflecting off it.

I’ll attempt an answer with a disclaimer first. I have not read the Dharma Sutras, the Rig Ved, or any of the Islamic texts you’ve referred to, and hence can’t quote from them to refute you. What I have read are English translations of the Mahabharata (parts, unfortunately), Bengali translation of the Ramayana, English translation of the Manu Samhita, the English Bible, and a children’s version of the Koran in Bengali. Suffice to say that when I read these, I did it with an intention of understanding them and the people who follow them, comparing them, and not to get indoctrinated by any of them. I will explain my stance shortly.

However, if the alarming paucity of my knowledge creeps you out, then you need not read further although I’ll write it down.

It’s not my intention to defend my views with citations of XYZ ritual/system in ABC religion, particularly regarding the treatment of women. And my reasons are simple. The religious texts that we commonly refer to were written as an attempt to create a social system and standardise certain practices that were supposedly better than what prevailed before that. Therefore, even though I do not agree with certain provisions laid down in the Manu Samhita, I recognise that these provisions were decidedly better than having no provisions at all (anarchy) or practicing things that are obviously not as good. [“Whose good?” is one question I frequently ask myself whenever I read about or discuss such things, and in every religious text, the “good of man” is equated to the good of woman, though it is not necessarily so at all times. However, I gather this is of lesser importance than the predominant theme of my reply.] I believe a fruitful discussion should not limit itself to the written words in these texts – and rather try and understand the spirit governing these texts.

And I think you would see where I’m going — I see these texts as steps in the meta-narrative of progress. I know there’s a whole industry manufacturing theories on the concept of progress, viz. in the tradition of western intellectual thought and innovation (the Renaissance for example) — though I would like to also include important legislations in different parts of the world that have bettered the lot of women — in this story of progress. For example the women’s right to property ultimately leading to extending the right to vote and the right to equal opportunities in education to women.

Do we have these provisions in modern India? Yes, on paper; no in the vaste swathes of people who live in villages [and citified folks like me have to deal with a smattering of secular mish-mash]. Did we have these provisions in the time when this country was ruled by Hindu kings? No, and that’s understandable because that was more than 1000 years ago and it’s only natural and desirable that the human condition should improve over 1000 years.

And now to bite the bullet. Has the condition of Indian men and women improved over the last 1000 years, i.e. after the domination of Islamic and British rulers? I think some things have gotten worse, although some things have gotten better. Example – I, as a middle class woman, have managed to get an education which would have been far-fetched 500 years ago. So the short answer is that indeed Islamic statehood has derailed the story of progress to a certain extent in India.

I do agree with you that official historiography paints a picture of Indian nationhood that is decidedly not what is handed down through the oral traditions. That, I think, is one of the things going downhill – because a nation that forgets its history is likely to repeat it past mistakes rather than learn from it.

And my long attempt at an answer is trying to do precisely that — learn from the past to build a better nation. It’s important that we question rules — both past and existing — to see how good they are. It’s also important that we change for the better.

However, at some point I think this animosity and retribution has to end. It’s not the same as denying that Islamic invaders and rulers have practiced (and perpetuated) regressive things in our country for generations. Notwithstanding I think it’s important that one doesn’t become a demon to fight another demon. That’s to say that I, as a Hindu, would not want to emulate a temple-burning cut-throat jihadi by asking Muslims in general to pay the price for the sordid violence spread by others in the name of that religion.

What should be one’s action in this regard is, I believe, fodder for another post?

If you want, you may reply by email:

Perhaps an objective analysis of the causes of the rape, I would like to share with in this blog which I came across.http://evolvingnewindia.wordpress.com/2013/01/12/empowering-women-with-firearms/

The word horror gets an altogether new meaning reading the article. Than human are animals if not chained by a sober society is evident.


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